Pascal Gabriel, noted producer and remixer, was born in Belgium, and moved to London as a teenager. After a couple of years in an art school band and the occasional performance of ambient music he started his record producing career. He met Mark Moore and Tim Simenon and, within a year or two, wrote and produced some of the most influential dance records ever made under the group names S'Express and Bomb The Bass. His production credits include Jimmy Somerville, Inspiral Carpets and Claudia Brucken.

Peter Murphy, in Istanbul writing his "Cascade" album, was searching for a producer with the willingness to suspend normal work methods and preconceived sound ideas. Enter Pascal.

"I had to find somebody who didn't come with a set of expectations," says Murphy. "I didn't want someone to come in and diplomatically pay lip service to being stylistically open while they were actually coming on board with a definite direction for the album. Pascal was very versatile. I met him and I just knew it was going to work".

Whilst Pascal was in in Istanbul working on Cascade he met Murphy's co-writer Paul Statham and the seeds of Peach were planted.

Pascal's post-Peach career included continuing his song-writing collaboration with Paul for a while, although I understand they're no longer working together at the time of writing. They worked together on Dido's 'Here With Me' in 1997. Pascal also did some production work on Natalie Imbruglia's album, "White Lilies Island", co-producing the track "Beauty On The Fire". Paul also contributed guitars and programming to this track.

See Paul's bio for details of other projects they've worked on.

Lisa Lamb, the South-African born daughter of a political scientist dad and a lecturer mum grew up shuttling between Washington D.C. and London after her parents divorced. She graduated from the Chelsea School of Art and decided to try her luck in the USA. A vocalist with a background in jazz and R&B, she worked with Troublefunk, Spiral and Band Of Gypsies.

Back in the UK, one night a friend asked Lisa to come to the opening of an art exhibition, where she overheard two young men enthusing about Kraftwerk and Beck. Her courage fortified by drink, Lisa joined their conversation. The two men introduced themselves to her - their names were Pascal Gabriel and Paul Statham and the three arranged to meet up another time. A few trips to the demo studio later, Peach was formed. Sharp eyed aficionados will however have noticed that some press releases claim the trio met in a Turkish bath - I guess sometime soon I will have to confirm which story is true!

Since the breakup of the trio in 1998 Lisa's career has embraced such diverse projects as hosting a national radio show for a year and performing in various jazz gigs around the UK and in the US. She has continued to write songs for herself and other artists, including a joint project with Alphaville guitarist Christian Marsac, and she also collaborated with another musician, Jamie Perkins, recording a song written and produced by him, "Through My Eyes", which received radio airplay in LA in the fall of 2001.

She's also written music for both film and video games, and since her marriage has settled down to running her own consultancy business, helping companies to build their corporate identities through the use of sonic branding and music marketing, and she also wants to continue writing music for films.

Lisa has contributed a great deal to this website, providing photos, press cuttings and anecdotes, which has enabled me to keep this site very up to date. She has no plans to return to performing as an artist, but remains proud of the work done with Peach.

Paul Statham was born in Shirebrook, a Derbyshire mining village. While still at school he became a founding member of his first band B-Movie and the band quickly signed to Stevos 'Some Bizarre' label in 1981. He then spent 8 years writing, recording and touring with Peter Murphy (ex Bauhaus). After five albums, however, Statham became bored with the Goth world (bats, crypts, etc.) and opted to stay true to his secret pop heart. "I reached a point where I just thought, `Give me some pop music, I need something light, no more goth please.'

Paul was in Istanbul working with Peter Murphy on his "CASCADE" album when he met Pascal Gabriel, who produced the album. The album was co-written with Paul. Musical sketches and backing-track ideas from Statham formed the framework to Murphy's melodies and vocal structures. "There's no fixed agenda between Paul and me," says Murphy. "He has an eclectic spectrum of tastes that aren't limited by style. That gives me a very wide canvas to experiment on. By the time we had completed twenty or so songs for the record, it was obvious to us that we had something very special on our hands." The effectiveness of this creative relationship is revealed in CASCADE's broad sonic scope.

Paul has also done production work with Peter Murphy and Kevin Rowland.

Pascal and Paul continued their writing and producing collaborations in the immediate post-Peach period, co-writing and producing two of the tracks on Dido's acclaimed "No Angel" album. The duo also contributed to Kylie Minogue's "Fever" album, co-writing and producing the track "Your Love", and another composition of theirs - "Tightrope" was used as the final track on the Australian release of the album. They also contributed 3 songs to a demo that Bananarama used when shopping for a new record contract - one of the tracks, "Sleep", made the final cut of their "Exotica" album.

Another post-Peach collaboration well worth tracking down is the song they contributed to Dot Allison's 1999 solo debut album "Afterglow". Called "Close Your Eyes", this is truly a peachy perfection of a song and probably the closest in style to the material on "Audiopeach".

Since the demise of Peach, he has collaborated with a number of artists including Shara Nelson, Dot Allison, Lena Fiagby and the formation of Kimberley Park with singer Cleo Bayley (to be released on his own Loki Records) in addition to the artists already mentioned above. At the same time he began collaborating with well known artist and art curator Victor de Circasia who encouraged him to work on visual and audio installations in galleries around the world. In the past 2 years, Paul has had many installations in European galleries and collaborated with the poet Neil Rollinson, painter's Daisy Cook, Giuliana Fresco and sculptors Noriaki Maeda and David Mach. In 2003 he set up a small label: Loki Records to release some of the music used in these installations and a single from Kimberley Park.

For more details on Paul's career, please visit his stylish official website at www.paulstatham.com.

Where are they now?

Sadly, Peach disbanded in 1998 shortly after the long awaited release of their debut album. Although On My Own and From This Moment On were UK chart successes, a series of delays meant it was almost a year before the debut album followed. Postponement of release dates and juggling with re-releasing "On My Own" in the UK instead of the scheduled "Made In Vain" was probably a contributing factor. Lack of publicity also conspired to ensure the album was not as successful as it should have been.

Since going their separate ways, Paul and Pascal have continued as writers and producers in their own fields, and Lisa has left the pop world behind and settled into a more stable business life away from the spotlight.

So Peach are no more, but they've left a legacy of sparkling pop tunes that will stand out as classics in the years to come. Their continuing popularity is evident in the number of emails I get from fans, and check out the guestbook comments too. And seemingly people can't get enough of the videos they made ... almost 2000 downloads of them in the three years this site has been up!

The site has been recently updated with a new press cuttings section (courtesy of Lisa who kindly sent me a ton of stuff) and there's also a new photo gallery page and some minor graphic design tweaking throughout the site. Thanks for your visit, and stay Peachy!

Caroline Griffith
Updated May 3, 2004.